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Strict New MOT Rules Coming Into Practice This Sunday

Strict New MOT Rules Coming Into Practice This Sunday

New MOT rules are coming into practice this weekend, and not only will the rest be harder to pass, but it also gets more complicated even after you've passed the test.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is revising the automotive health check which will see new defect types and other stricter rules come into force from this Sunday the 20th May.

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New Categories

Cars will no longer receive a pass or fail but instead will now receive one of five grades: Pass, Advisory, Minor, Major and Dangerous.

Cars will fail the MoT if they reveal a defect that poses "a direct and dangerous risk to road safety or has a serious impact on the environment." This would be graded as Dangerous.

Credit: JESHOOTS.com/Pexels
Credit: JESHOOTS.com/Pexels

Cars will also fail if the fault "may affect the vehicle's safety, put other road users at risk or have an impact on the environment." This would be graded as Major.

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Cars with a fault posing "no significant effect on the safety of the vehicle or impact on the environment" will be regarded as minor and will pass, although they will need to carry out the recommended repairs.

Cars will also pass if a potential future fault is identified with a caution to keep an eye on it.

At the moment, drivers aren't allowed to drive without a valid MoT and can be fined up to £1,000 if you're caught.

However normally drivers book their MoT a month before their current certificate expires which means if their car does fail they can still drive away with it and have time to get it fixed.

But the new rules means that if your car does fail it's MoT you can't drive it until you get it fixed and re-tested. If you do you could face a fine of £2,500.

Credit: Neromare Design/Pexels
Credit: Neromare Design/Pexels

New checks

Mechanics carrying out the MoTs will be checking to see whether:

  • Your tyres are clearly under-inflated
  • Your brake fluid has been contaminated
  • Any fluid leaks pose a risk to the environment
  • Your brake pad warning lights work and if any brake pads or discs are missing
  • Your reversing lights on vehicles first used from 1 September 2009 still work
  • Your headlight washers on vehicles first used from 1 September 2009 still work (if they have them)
  • Your daytime running lights on vehicles first used from 1 March 2018 still work (most of these vehicles will not be due for an MOT until 2021)
Credit: Pixabay
Credit: Pixabay

Stricter tests on diesel emissions

If you drive a diesel car you will be failed with a major fault if:

  • Coloured smoke is found coming from the exhaust
  • Evidence that the diesel particulate filter (DPF) which stories exhaust soot has been tampered with.

Commenting on the changes, RAC spokesman Simon Williams told Auto Express: "While on the surface this change, which is part of an EU Directive due to come into force in May, seems like a sensible move, we fear many motorists could end up being confused.

"Rather than MOT failures simply being black and white, the new system creates the potential for confusion as testers will have to make a judgement as to whether faults are 'Dangerous', 'Major' or 'Minor'.

"Motorists may also struggle to understand the difference between 'Dangerous' and 'Major' failures. The current system ensures that any vehicle with a fault that doesn't meet the MOT requirements is repaired appropriately before being allowed back on the road."

Featured Image Credit: Pixabay/JESHOOTS.com/Pexels

Topics: News, Driving, Real

Haleema Khokhar

Haleema Khokhar is a Freelance Journalist at PRETTY52. She graduated from University of Central Lancashire in Journalism and has since gained over three years experience working within the communications and marketing industry before going freelance as a Content Writer. Contact her on haleema.khokhar@pretty52.com

 

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