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This Study On How Men And Women Split Household Chores Will Leave You Raging

This Study On How Men And Women Split Household Chores Will Leave You Raging

The housework as being a woman's job is a common trope in sexism, but not one you expect to be true in the the 21st Century.

However, a new study has found that "gender norms remain strong" when it comes to the division of household chores.

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The research, titled 'Gender Divisions of Paid and Unpaid Work in Contemporary UK Couples', analysed data from 8,500 heterosexual couples and found women did the bulk of the domestic duties in 93 per cent of the couples, The Independent report.

Credit: Pexels
Credit: Pexels

Published in the Work, Employment and Society journal, the study also found women do approximately 16 hours of household chores per week, while men did nearer to six.

Sigh.

To add to this, where both members of the couple were in full-time employment, the woman was five times more likely to spend a minimum of 20 hours per week on chores than the man.

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As part of the analysis, the couples were split into a number of different groups depending on earning power and participation in household chores. These included a group for joint earners, a 'female earner group' (where the women were the chief earners), a 'male earner group' (where the men took home the most) and more.

Credit: Pexels
Credit: Pexels

Two were considered the "most egalitarian" by the researchers: the 'female-earner group' and 'male domestic long hours' group, where the men spent longer hours doing housework (which equated to just one per cent of couples).

The researchers wrote: "The female-earner group was the only group in which men's contribution to the housework was similar to that of their partners, and this group had the highest proportion of women with educational qualifications higher than those of their partners."

The 'male domestic long hours' saw the men spend an average of 20 hours a week doing housework, but under two thirds of their female partners also did housework.

The study concluded that "gender norms remain strong" in the division of household work in modern UK couples.

The only glimmer of hope we have is that the couples were interviewed between 2010 and 2011, meaning there's a chance things could have changed in the last eight years.

Here's hoping...

Featured Image Credit: Columbia Pictures

Topics: Life, sexism, Life News

Ciara Sheppard

Ciara is a freelance journalist working for Pretty 52. After graduating from the University of Sussex, Ciara worked as a writer at GLAMOUR Magazine and later as the Assistant Editor of Yahoo Style UK. Please contact her on ciarasheppard@hotmail.co.uk.

 

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