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​Average Size Of A Newborn Baby Explained

The arrival of a new baby also brings dozens of questions for parents, from how to change your baby's nappy, to is your baby feeding right?

Another questions parents wonder is if their tot is a 'normal size.'

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Here's what you need to know about the average weight and length of a newborn in the UK.

When your bundle of joy is born, doctors will measure his or her weight, length and their head circumference.

If your baby is premature, they're likely to be quite small, whereas a baby who arrived late could grow to a notable size.

Your baby's size at birth will not necessarily relate to their adult height. A big newborn baby could still become a short adult and vice versa.

Credit: Rene Asmussen/Pexels
Credit: Rene Asmussen/Pexels

What's the normal weight of a newborn?

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The average weight of a baby is 7.7lbs.

Most babies who are born full term will weigh between 6-9lbs at birth.

A baby who weighs less than 5.5lbs s considered to have a low birth weight.

A newborn who weighs more than 8.8lbs is considered larger than normal and may be referred to as macrosomia.

These babies are often born to mums who developed gestational diabetes while pregnant.

Credit: Wayne Evans/Pexels
Credit: Wayne Evans/Pexels

What are the chances of having a big baby?

  • If you were a big baby yourself
  • If you were overweight before becoming pregnant
  • If you've gained a lot of weight during pregnancy
  • If you give birth two or more weeks after your due date

What's the normal length of a newborn?

A baby who's born at full term will normally be between 50-53cm long, with an average length of 51cm.

If the parents are tall the baby will often be longer and vice versa for short parents.

Credit: Bingo Theme/Pexels
Credit: Bingo Theme/Pexels

What if my baby loses weight after birth?

Newborns carry extra fluid, so it's perfectly normal for their weight to drop by seven to 10% in the first few days.

However, their birth weight should be regained by about two weeks.

The NHS gives new parents growth charts in a red book, so you can track your little one growing.

Featured Image Credit: Rene Asmussen/ Pexels and Wayne Evans/Pexels

Topics: News, Real

Haleema Khokhar

Haleema Khokhar is a Freelance Journalist at PRETTY52. She graduated from University of Central Lancashire in Journalism and has since gained over three years experience working within the communications and marketing industry before going freelance as a Content Writer. Contact her on haleema.khokhar@pretty52.com

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