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Five-Year-Old Boy Dies After His Sepsis Was "Misdiagnosed" As Diabetes

The parents of a five-year-old autistic boy claim doctors gave their son ten times the correct dose of insulin after misdiagnosing him with diabetes.

Shay Turner, from Rawmarsh in South Yorkshire, was rushed to hospital on 30th March last year but died four days later after he suffered a catastrophic brain injury.

Credit: SWNS
Credit: SWNS

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His parents, Laura, 28, and Martyn, 28, claim medics missed the fact he was suffering from sepsis and gave him a huge amount of insulin by mistake.

"Shay looked tired, he kept saying he couldn't go to the toilet, he wanted to drink but couldn't keep any water down and kept being sick. By the time his dad came home from work Shay looked grey and we decided to go to A&E," she explained.

Credit: SWNS
Credit: SWNS

Doctors recorded Shay's blood sugar levels as high and diagnosed him as diabetic even though Laura and Martyn were convinced this was incorrect. At 18kg, the maximum amount of insulin he should have been given was 1.8ml. Instead he was given 18ml.

With his condition deteriorating rapidly, Shay was moved to Sheffield Children's Hospital. Laura said: "When they opened him up, they discovered his large intestine had died.

Credit: SWNS
Credit: SWNS

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"It was then the surgeon said it could have been sepsis that caused the problem.

"As soon as they removed his intestine, his vitals improved dramatically. Even though he wasn't conscious and was still on life support, we had some hope," says Laura. But after a CT scan showed he had suffered a brain injury, it was agreed the little boy should be taken off life support.

Shay's autopsy report said he died from multiple organ failure from an unknown cause with the possibility of Hirschsprung disease - a condition that is the result of missing nerve cells in the muscles of the colon - leading to a bowel infection and causing sepsis. The coroner's report concluded that Shay did not have diabetes.

The couple have now launched a crowdfunding appeal to raise £12,000 to pay for solicitors to represent them at an inquest in October.

A spokesperson for Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust, which runs Rotherham General Hospital, said: "Our thoughts and sympathies are very much with Shay's family and our medical director has recently written to them about the serious incident investigation which we are currently undertaking.

"Given an inquest is scheduled for the autumn, we cannot comment further at this time."

Topics: News, Life News, Real, Health

Amber Ascroft

Amber is a freelance beauty editor and lifestyle journalist. She's written for the likes of STYLIST, Red, Harper's Bazaar, Mail Online and Good Housekeeping and starred on ITV's This Morning.

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