​Keeping Your Christmas Lights Up 'Is Good For Your Mental Health'

Keeping your Christmas lights up all year is supposedly good for your mental health, says one psychologist - perfect if you are not ready to let go of the festivities just yet.

While superstitions suggest that it is bad luck to keep your Christmas decorations up past 5th December, these beliefs beg to differ.

According to Chicago environmental and design psychologist Dr Sally Augustin, keeping Christmas lights up is actually super good for you.

Speaking to Mail Online, she said: "We like to think we're so different from animals, but we are actually very responsive to our senses.

"Developing on the savanna, where our current sensory systems developed, when we would see warm light, it was often a campfire at the end of the day, signalling cooking and positive experiences."

The warm light is supposedly good for our senses. (Credit: Pexels)
The warm light is supposedly good for our senses. (Credit: Pexels)

Dr Augustin believes that we have evolved so that "our eyes and neural networks developed in tandem in a way that creates positive associations with warmer light" creating a better and more relaxed mood.

She added: "When we experience warmer coloured lights, candlelight or light from warmer bulbs, it puts us in a more positive mood, which is great for getting along with others."

So not only does it put you in a good mood, it also means you might have less arguments.

It's the perfect excuse to keep your home cosy all year. (Credit: Pexels)
It's the perfect excuse to keep your home cosy all year. (Credit: Pexels)

Apparently, it all links back to the Danish and Norwegian trend of Hygge which refers to ways of making a space cosy and feel like home.

Dr Augustin says: "Make sure there are lots of soft textures and cuddly warm blankets.

"We have positive associations to soft warm, cuddly and flannel textures. These are all good things in our mind that boost our mood, and when we are in a better mood, we get along better."

The lights could also result in less arguments. (Credit: Pexels)
The lights could also result in less arguments. (Credit: Pexels)

For more help and support surrounding mental health, you visit Mind here.

Featured Image Credit: Pexels

Bethany Gleave

Bethany Gleave is a Freelance Journalist at PRETTY52 and joined the team in 2018. She is a Multimedia Journalism graduate from the University of Salford, and started her career at a national press agency, writing breaking and trending news for the national newspapers.

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